No collective leave days as Indonesian government releases provisional 2022 holiday schedule

Broken Beach, one of the top tourist destinations in Nusa Penida, an island   southeast of Bali. Photo: Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy
Broken Beach, one of the top tourist destinations in Nusa Penida, an island southeast of Bali. Photo: Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy

Is it just us, or has 2021 both flown by and been a drag due to its lack of collective leave days? Well, prepare to let out a collective gasp with the realization that 2022 is only three months away ⁠— and it may also be another holiday-starved year.

A joint decision letter on next year’s national holidays schedule signed by Religious Affairs Minister Yaqut Cholil Qoumas, Manpower Minister Ida Fauziyah, and Administrative and Bureaucratic Reform Minister Tjahjo Kumolo was released today. 

Next year, there will be 16 public holidays, while collective leave days ⁠— many of which were cancelled throughout the pandemic so Indonesians don’t go on extended holidays and risk increasing coronavirus transmissions ⁠— have been left out of the provisional schedule.

In a virtual press conference today, Coordinating Minister for Human Development and Culture Muhadjir Effendy said that the collective leave dates may be added on later, depending on how Indonesia fares with the COVID-19 crisis.

While there is ample optimism for the days ahead, owing to an ever increasing COVID-19 vaccination rate and loosening of restrictions as caseloads plummet in numerous regions, we still need to be vigilant, lest the government take away our collective leave days again.

Without further ado, here is the 2022 public holiday calendar:

Saturday, January 1 (New Year)

Tuesday, February 1 (Chinese New Year)

Monday, February 28 (Ascension of the Prophet Muhammad)

Thursday, March 3 (The Balinese Day of Silence)

Friday, April 15 (Good Friday)

Sunday, May 1 (May Day)

Monday-Tuesday, May 2-3 (Eid al-Fitr)

Monday, May 16 (Vesak)

Thursday, May 26 (Ascension of Christ)

Wednesday, June 1 (Pancasila Day)

Saturday, July 9 (Eid al-Adha)

Saturday, July 30 (Islamic New Year)

Wednesday, August 17 (Independence Day)

Saturday, October 8 (Birth of the Prophet Muhammad)

Sunday, December 25 (Christmas)

 

Also Read:

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