Padang authorities confiscate ‘Ngocok Yuk’ coffee truck for sexually suggestive name

On Wednesday, Padang’s Public Order Police (Satpol PP) confiscated a coffee truck by a brand named Ngocok Yuk, which literally translates to “Let’s Shake.” Photo: Padang Public Order Agency
On Wednesday, Padang’s Public Order Police (Satpol PP) confiscated a coffee truck by a brand named Ngocok Yuk, which literally translates to “Let’s Shake.” Photo: Padang Public Order Agency

A coffee purveyor in the West Sumatra capital of Padang brewed himself some trouble after local authorities took issue with his product’s sexually suggestive name.

On Wednesday, the city’s Public Order Police (Satpol PP) confiscated a coffee truck by a brand named Ngocok Yuk, which literally translates to “Let’s Shake.”

While Ngocok Yuk is a portmanteau for “Ngopi” (drinking coffee) and “Coklat” (chocolate), those familiar with Indonesian slang may recognize the phrase as a euphemism for masturbation.

“We received reports of a coffee-chocolate brand with the tagline ‘Ngocok Yuk, Makin Dikocok Makin Nikmat’ (let’s shake, the more you shake the more pleasurable it is). When we arrived, [the brand and tagline] turned out to be true and then we brought the truck to our office,” Satpol PP Padang Chief Al Amin told Kompas yesterday.

Ngocok Yuk’s 27-year-old owner, identified by his initials JF, was asked to sign a pledge to change the brand’s name and tagline.

Al Amin said the truck was returned to JF after he signed the pledge. If the business owner violates the pledge, he may be charged with some minor offenses.

In West Sumatra, giving “improper” names to food products was recently forbidden by the province’s chapter of the Indonesian Ulema Council (MUI), the country’s highest clerical body. In late September, MUI West Sumatera declared food, beverages and other edible products containing themes related to hell and satan to be haram (forbidden for consumption by Muslims).

The fatwa came after authorities in Padang began cracking down on satanic F&B names in July. A fatwa is not legally binding in Indonesia, but can be used as a basis to pass laws in the Muslim-majority country.

Furthermore, MUI’s fatwa states that if a dish is named after something that is considered immoral, such as “ayam dada montok” (plump chicken breast) or “mie caruik” (mie means noodles and caruik means a potty mouth), then it will be considered makruh (advised against, but not forbidden).

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