Rain shaman in Lombok sues Twitter user for defamation for saying he failed to prevent downpour during Superbike race

The first of the two races in Mandalika, which was scheduled for Saturday, was postponed by a day due to bad weather. 
Photo courtesy of World SBK.
The first of the two races in Mandalika, which was scheduled for Saturday, was postponed by a day due to bad weather. Photo courtesy of World SBK.

A rain shaman in Lombok is on a quest to set things straight about his abilities, as he has reported a Twitter user to the police after he accused him of failing to keep the rain away during the World Superbike Championship (WSBK) over the weekend. 

The rain shaman in question, Damai Santoso AKA Amaq Daud, claimed that he was never asked to perform his service during the actual WSBK race, which took place at the Mandalika Circuit. The first of the two races, which was scheduled for Saturday, was postponed by a day due to bad weather. 

“I was never asked to be the rain shaman by the race organizer, but why is it [that the Twitter user] used my photo as if I was the rain shaman for the race? And there were also words of ridicule [against me],” Damai said today. 

Damai Santoso AKA Amaq Daud filed a police report in Central Lombok today. Photo: Istimewa

A photo of Damai was posted online in connection to the heavy rain that occurred during the grand prix, with at least one netizen accusing him of failing to do his job. With Damai protective of his reputation, some members of his family felt like he was slandered, encouraging him to press charges against the Twitter user.  

Redho Rizki, a police officer at the Central Lombok Precinct, confirmed that authorities have received Damai’s complaint, accusing the Twitter user of defamation. 

“My hope is that the perpetrator will be found soon and apologize about what he posted [because] it wasn’t what actually happened,” the shaman said. 

Under Indonesia’s controversial Information and Electronic Transactions Act (UU ITE), defamation is a crime punishable by up to four years in prison. 

Though there has never been any scientific proof backing up their claims, rain shamans are popular in Indonesia, as they are often hired by organizers to keep outdoor events dry.

Also Read ⁠— Heavy rain and water puddle humping: The most memorable moments from Mandalika circuit’s inaugural grand prix

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