Bali officials ask Atlas Beach Fest to postpone business until it sorts out permits

Atlas Beach Fest, previously known as Holywings Bali, is launched in July, 2022, and the management claimed that it is set to be the biggest beach club in Southeast Asia. Photo: IG/@atlasbeachfest.
Atlas Beach Fest, previously known as Holywings Bali, is launched in July, 2022, and the management claimed that it is set to be the biggest beach club in Southeast Asia. Photo: IG/@atlasbeachfest.

Mere days after launching what has been dubbed the biggest beach club in Southeast Asia, Atlas Beach Fest (previously known as Holywings Bali) is under the spotlight – again – after a high-ranking official asked them to finalize all requirements for running their business.

As previously reported, Atlas Beach Fest was launched last week after being rebranded amid controversies surrounding Holywings Indonesia in general. Noted attorney Hotman Paris Hutapea, one of the club’s shareholders who often acts as the establishment’s spokesman, said during the launch that there were no problems surrounding the venue’s permits and that Atlas Beach Fest was ready to cater to guests.

Read also: Holywings Bali rebrands as Atlas Beach Fest as new club takes off

Sure enough, some Instagram influencers have already documented their first visits to Atlas Beach Fest, while Hotman himself uploaded pictures of the launch, featuring images of him hobnobbing with some guests at the venue.

Bali Province’s Regional Secretary Dewa Made Indra, however, said the party may have to stop for now, as Atlas Beach Fest has reportedly not finalized all of its business licenses.

“If the permits do not exist then [business] operations are not allowed,” he said in Denpasar over the weekend.

Dewa said that Governor Wayan Koster has sent officials from the island’s Tourism Agency to inspect all Atlas Beach Fest’s legal permits. He confirmed that, since Holywings is still facing legal matters in other parts of Indonesia, the Tourism Agency has to be vigilant in checking the validity of the company’s permits on the Island of Gods.

Previously, Bali Regional Council member Dewa Nyoman Rai, who claimed that he had been in touch with the island’s business licensing agency, pointed out that Atlas Beach Fest’s operational permits had not yet been issued. He also questioned whether or not the venue had the license to sell booze, as well as other food and beverages.

High anticipation for the beach club was marred by a blasphemy scandal after the chain posted a free alcoholic drinks promo for men named Muhammad and women named Maria in June.

The promo sparked outrage in the Muslim-majority nation, prompting the closure of all 36 Holywings bars and clubs in the country. Aside from the Bali venue, there is no indication yet that any of Holywings outlets would be able to reopen.

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