End of an era: Ocean Park’s Mine Train, Raging River to be retired as part of park overhaul

Mine Train, a roller coaster known for its stunning view over the Aberdeen Harbor, is among the iconic rides that Ocean Parks plans to phase out. Photo: YouTube/Theme Park Reviews
Mine Train, a roller coaster known for its stunning view over the Aberdeen Harbor, is among the iconic rides that Ocean Parks plans to phase out. Photo: YouTube/Theme Park Reviews

Ocean Park will retire a number of its most-loved rides and introduce a new business model whereby entry will be free but guests pay for individual attractions, the park said Monday.

Among the rides that will be phased out are the Mine Train, the park’s iconic roller coaster overlooking the Aberdeen Harbor, and Raging River, the family-friendly water ride.

According to HK01, a total of seven rides will be retired over the next few years, including the Flying Swing, Crazy Galleon and Abyss.

The park will also be overhauling its business model, scrapping ticket entrance fees—currently HK$498 (US$64) for adults—in favor of a pay-per-ride system.

“This gives citizens and consumers a very important flexibility,” Ocean Park Chairman Lau Ming-wai said at a press conference, explaining that visitors have in the past complained that they are not able to make their entry ticket worthwhile.

A 42,000 meter square free-to-enter retail, dining and entertainment area in the park’s lower area will host open-air markets, a children’s play zone and other facilities for those less interested in seeking a thrill.

In place of the attractions that will be scrapped, the park will outsource its entertainment by partnering with different operators, providing a new experience for visitors of a park that has been criticized for staying much the same since opening 44 years ago.

Read more: Dolphin show to be scrapped as part of Ocean Park revamp

The park’s animal conservation and education-related facilities, including the panda exhibit and the aquarium, will be integrated into the free-to-enter area.

The proposed way forward, it is hoped, will allow the cash-strapped park to improve its struggling financial position. The park was closed for about two-thirds of last year due to the local COVID-19 epidemic.

The park reopened last September and was forced to close for the third time in December amid a spike in local cases.

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CITY: HONG KONGCATEGORY: NEWS

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