Impossible Foods’ plant-based meat patties now available for purchase in Hong Kong

Photo via Impossible Foods
Photo via Impossible Foods

Ever bite into an Impossible Burger at a restaurant and wish you could whip this up yourself—if only you had the key ingredient?

Well, now you can have your plant-based meat and eat it too. For the first time since Impossible Foods debuted in Hong Kong, Impossible meat patties are available for purchase for you to to cook in the comfort of your own home.

The US company has partnered with three restaurants, The Coffee Academics, CRFT PIT and The Butcher’s Club, as well as meal delivery company Gafell, to your doorstep—or rather, to your kitchen.

You can buy the faux meat on their online stores, and in person too at The Coffee Academics.

By allowing restaurants to resell their inventory, the collaboration also aims to support the city’s battered food and beverage industry, which has been hit hard by the coronavirus epidemic.

“The program is designed to help provide restaurants with an additional revenue stream for takeout orders and enable fans to cook Impossible meat at home for the first time,” Impossible Foods says.

The plant-based meat comes in a 10 patty pack and can also be bought in bulk.

https://www.facebook.com/ImpossibleFoods/photos/a.972469479476532/3073290092727783/?type=3&theater

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Impossible Foods debuted in the city in 2018, making Hong Kong the first stop for the Silicon Valley start-up’s venture abroad. Since then, it’s found its way to over a hundred restaurants including Beef & Liberty, Elephant Grounds, Fini’s, and even chain cafe Pacific Coffee.

The plant-based meat is most commonly incorporated into burgers, but has also been reimagined in the form of dumplings, taco filling and minced meat for bolognese sauce.

Founded in 2011, Impossible Foods shook up the meat substitute market when it launched its signature patties five years later. The company’s plant-based meat aims to give people the taste and nutritional benefits of meat without the negative health and environmental impacts.

Made of soy, the patty is free of gluten, animal hormones, or antibiotics, and is said to contain less calories than beef. Impossible Foods touts the plant-based meat as a healthy alternative to animal protein, though it has fought back criticism that it is heavily processed and higher in fat.

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CITY: HONG KONGCATEGORY: FOOD & DRINKSUB-CATEGORIES: F&B NEWS

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