They’ve been barred from Thailand’s buses, hospitals and banks. Their crime? Being Burmese.

Discrimination has become a part of everyday life for migrant Myanmar workers in Thailand since they were blamed for igniting a second wave of COVID-19 infections there. In the weeks since the outbreak began, Myanmar nationals have been denied access to basic services, and the Thai authorities share some blame for ratcheting up the rhetoric ...

Politics

Military-backed party refuses to accept Myanmar election outcome, demands do-over

Military-backed party refuses to accept Myanmar election outcome, demands do-over

On the way to a resounding defeat in Sunday’s election, a military proxy party this afternoon rejected the results and challenged the poll’s legitimacy. The Union...

NLD coasting to victory and 2nd term for ASSK as votes counted

NLD coasting to victory and 2nd term for ASSK as votes counted

The National League for Democracy says it has already won enough seats to form the next government while the tally from yesterday’s election is still being counted. Though the...

COVID-19 now under control in Yangon: ASSK

COVID-19 now under control in Yangon: ASSK

State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi says the explosive outbreak of coronavirus infections has been brought under control in the Yangon region. Addressing her party two weeks before...

New Toy: Myanmar’s military shows off Russian attack sub

New Toy: Myanmar’s military shows off Russian attack sub

When the Tatmadaw navy conducted its annual exercises, it had a new asset to brag about: the UMS Min Ye Thain Kha Thu, a Russian-made attack submarine. The 74-meter Kilo-class...

New passports and flags as Yangon splinters into COVID city-states

New passports and flags as Yangon splinters into COVID city-states

USA now stands for the United States of Ahlone. The UK is no longer the United Kingdom but United Kyimyindine, whose proud and sovereign people occupy both banks of the Hlaing...

Tour guide turned Arakan Army commander sees nationhood in victory

Tour guide turned Arakan Army commander sees nationhood in victory

While the world’s attention is focused on COVID-19, war is brewing in the jungles of western Myanmar. The Arakan Army, or AA, was formed just a few years ago by students,...

Top officials who banned crowds from gathering blasted for gathering in crowd

Top officials who banned crowds from gathering blasted for gathering in crowd

Yangon’s regional government is under fire today after a top official and the chairman of its pandemic response team attended a Sunday religious festival in apparent defiance of...

Military silent after vowing action against soldiers who filmed boat beating

Military silent after vowing action against soldiers who filmed boat beating

A week after the Burmese military said it would investigate five of its soldiers caught beating a group of Rakhine civilians on a boat, no progress has been cited in the case. The...

Angry Buddhist mob swarms Meiktila monastery after man ‘insults’ religion on Facebook (Video)

Angry Buddhist mob swarms Meiktila monastery after man ‘insults’ religion on Facebook (Video)

Scuffles broke out outside a monastery where hardline Buddhists yesterday gathered to seek mob justice against a man whose sharp-tongued criticism was deemed an insult to the...


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Coconuts Yangon Politics

This was the big buzzword of 2015 and 2016. Aung San Suu Kyi led her party to election victory in November of 2015 and formed a government in April 2016. This ended some five decades of military-controlled rule. In September 2016, the US dropped its remaining sanctions on Myanmar. But many problems remain. The military still controls 25 percent of parliament. Suu Kyi was barred from the presidential post because of a clause in the 2008 constitution – written by the military – preventing anyone with a foreign spouse or children from holding the post. She has one British son and one American son. Instead, she took the jobs of foreign minister and state counsellor, and her close aide Htin Kyaw was nominated for the presidency, giving her the leeway to still make all the decisions and represent the country as its de facto leader. For her administration to succeed, it will need to address an intimidating list of priorities, including making peace with several ethnic armed groups in the country and helping to resolve tensions in Rakhine State between Buddhists and Rohingya Muslims. Needless to say, stories about Myanmar politics are abundant on Coconuts Yangon.