Baby Bornean orangutan rescued after being kept as a pet

Baby primate Vena shyly turned her head away from a bottle as two vets tried to feed her, the latest Bornean orangutan rescued in Indonesia after being kept as a pet Villagers on the Indonesian part of jungle-clad Borneo island often keep the critically endangered apes as pets even though the practice is illegal Wildlife officials and environmentalists rescued seven-month-old Vena earlier in February from...

Environment

VIRAL: Brave Jakarta sanitation workers dive into pools of shit to unclog drains jammed with our trash

It should go without saying that, no matter what preventative measures the government builds to keep Jakarta from flooding, it will all be for nothing if the citizens don’t play...

VIRAL: Brave Jakarta sanitation workers dive into pools of shit to unclog drains jammed with our trash

These Indonesian villages are powered by locally sourced sustainable energy

By Della Syahni for Mongabay Indonesia and adapted by Aria Danaparamita In a country where much of the rural population lives off the grid, villages on the Indonesian...

These Indonesian villages are powered by locally sourced sustainable energy

Palm oil under fire as potential carcinogen, Oil Palm Research Institute scientist says risk doesn’t warrant a ban

An Indonesian food technologist admits that palm oil — which is widely used in the processed food industry — has a potentially carcinogenic contaminant, but says no...

Palm oil under fire as potential carcinogen, Oil Palm Research Institute scientist says risk doesn’t warrant a ban

Fire-prone Riau province declares early emergency to combat ‘haze’

Indonesia's fire-prone Riau province declared a state of emergency on Tuesday, the disaster mitigation agency said, after President Joko Widodo urged regional authorities to avoid...

Fire-prone Riau province declares early emergency to combat ‘haze’

HSBC funding Indonesian forest destruction: Greenpeace

Greenpeace on Tuesday accused banking giant HSBC of helping to arrange billions of dollars in financing for companies whose palm oil operations have been blamed for destroying...

HSBC funding Indonesian forest destruction: Greenpeace

Indonesian islands pay price for global smartphone rush

By Nick Perry Deep beneath the murky ocean, Paci breathes through a thin plastic tube as he dredges the seabed for tin, a vital component inside smartphones and tablets that's...

Indonesia adds more than 1,100 to the official tally of its islands

The Indonesian government has revised upward the official count of islands in its archipelago from 13,466 to 14,572 The former figure was submitted in 2012 to the last UN...

Indonesia adds more than 1,100 to the official tally of its islands

A new lease on life for Jakarta’s once-filthy rivers

A group of children gathered on the banks of the Ciliwung river in Jakarta, staring into the water and casting nets to try to catch fish Such a scene would have been...

A new lease on life for Jakarta’s once-filthy rivers

Indonesia’s land transfer a breakthrough for indigenous rights – activist

By Alisa Tang, Thomson Reuters Foundation Indonesia's decision to return customary lands to indigenous peoples is a breakthrough for their rights and a boost to campaigners...

Indonesia’s land transfer a breakthrough for indigenous rights – activist

Coconuts Jakarta Environment

It’s certainly nothing to be proud of, but name any kind of pollution - air, water, land - and Jakarta has it in abundance. A population of over 10 million in a city is obviously going to leave a sizeable footprint, but it has long been argued that Jakartans - both the people and the government - can still do much more to keep the city clean. But the fact of the matter is exhaust fumes from millions of motorized vehicles pollute the city’s air daily, its waterways are often used as trash dumps, and litter is a problem in most areas of the capital. At the very least, efforts are being made by the current city administration to clean up the city, as evidenced by the fact that the city’s rivers and canals are now at their cleanest state in years, if not decades. It also seems like more and more Jakartans are becoming more conscientious regarding the state of the city’s environment, as evidenced by the rise of clean up activities throughout Jakarta.