25 countries offer disaster assistance to Indonesia, Google and Apple pledge $1 million each

First responders treating survivors in Sulawesi. Photo: Save the Children

On Sunday, after the true scope of the devastation caused by the earthquake and tsunami that struck Central Sulawesi on Friday became clearer, the Indonesian government agreed to acceptance offers of aid from other countries and international NGOs.

Since then the world has responded, with at least 25 countries so far offering up assistance and a multitude of international NGOs and private companies pledging aid and donations to help speed relief efforts for the estimated 200,000 people still in urgent need. Unfortunately, most of that aid is still trickling into the country, with the region’s battered infrastructure making it difficult for rescue workers and supplies to reach many of the areas hit worst by the disasters.

Among the countries offering aid so far are the United States, France, Czech, Switzerland, Norway, Hungary, Turkey, Australia, South Korea, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, New Zealand, Singapore, Thailand, Japan, India and China as well as the European Union, ASEAN and the United Nations

 

US President Donald Trump was among many world leaders that called President Jokowi to convey his country’s condolences. During their talk yesterday, Trump also pledged assistance in the form of first responder teams and military personnel.

 

In addition to the many international charities working to bring vital assistance to Sulawesi (find out how you can donate to some of those groups here) several major corporations have pledged significant donations to help fund their efforts. Both Google and Apple have pledged US $1 million to the disaster relief efforts. Banking giant HSBC also pledged $125,000.

Those donations and the aid they will fund can’t come fast enough. The massive 7.5 earthquake and ensuing tsunami that struck the city of Palu and surrounding areas on Friday are estimated to have destroyed 66,000 homes and the official death toll currently stands at around 1,400 people.

 

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