Video of man doing parkour stunt 10 stories up at Hong Kong housing estate goes viral

A parkour enthusiast climbing down the balconies of a housing estate in Shek Kip Mei. Screengrab via YouTube.
A parkour enthusiast climbing down the balconies of a housing estate in Shek Kip Mei. Screengrab via YouTube.

A video of a man climbing down the side of a Hong Kong building by dropping from balcony to balcony some 10 stories above the ground has been lighting up the internet since appearing on Facebook on Sunday.

The video was filmed at one of the apartment blocks at the Nam Shan Estate, a public housing complex in Shek Kip Mei. Ming Pao reports that the individual residential blocks in the estate are about 11 stories tall, and the man can be seen in the video climbing down at least eight balconies before jumping onto an overhead canopy covering the second story, then dropping down to ground level.

It’s not clear who posted the video originally, but re-uploads have proliferated since it first appeared on Facebook on Sunday and have been viewed thousands of times.

As is the case with most things that are dangerous yet look awesome, the stunt was met with a mixture of admiration, jokes, and — because it’s the internet — outrage.

“Life doesn’t have a take two,” said one commenter.

“Children are going to watch this and teach themselves how to do dangerous stunts like that,” said another.

With its dense, towering buildings and Instagram-friendly rooftops, the SAR has long been an attractive destination for enthusiasts of parkour, the daredevil sport in which people navigate buildings and other structures like gymnastically inclined ninjas with death wishes.

In January, 2018, a parkour group called Storror uploaded a video of themselves jumping from rooftop to rooftop in Tsim Sha Tsui.

The UK-based group regularly film themselves performing death-defying leaps between buildings around the world, and in an interview with Coconuts HK — weeks after the Hong Kong stunt — they said the video took four days to film, and that they discourage people with less experience from trying to copy their feats.

Hear that kids? Don’t try this at home.

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